Purple flowers you should really know about

We here at Purple Flowers AZ love to popularize all types of flowers, not just flowers, orchids or lilies – in other worsd, the usual suspects. There are many beautiful purple flowers not so well known, and that’s really a shame. Let’s change that, shall we?

Purple carnation

Carnation comes in many colors, and purple is no exception. Purple carnations indicate capriciousness, or, sometimes spontaneity – the flower is what you might call a double edged sword. You can use to tell somebody they’re spontaneous, or you can use to signal whimsiness – be sure to use the right context, and if you’re receiving them, think twice before interpreting their meaning.

Delphinium

Delphinium are magnificent flowers, and you could often see them showing up at gardening contest; so why don’t we see them more often? Well… simply put, the plants are poisonous. Some are treated or grown or modified, but generally speaking, all purple Delphinium are poisonous. Still, they may be used for exhibition purposes, or, in small quantities, as herbal treatment.

Purple Freesia

As a European, I was actually shocked to see how little most people (especially Americans) know about this flower. It has a magnificent fragrance, while also looking just chique and elegant… really a great flower, suitable for most occasions.

Purple Gladiola

Gladiolae flowers are endemic to Africa, but have since spread into many households throughout the entire world. Nowadays, the genus is mostly distributed in Mediterranean Europe, Asia, Tropical Africa and South Africa. Gladiola often symbolizes hidden feelings, making it the best flower for people who want to get out of the “friend zone”. However, expect not many people knowing this. It can also mean inspiration.

Purple Hyacinth

Hyacinth was a Greek mythological hero, but I don’t really want to go into him and his fate, you can read all about that here. Hyacinths bulbs are poisonous, but the plants aren’t; they are often used to symbolize rebirth, and are definitely pleasant on the eye.

Purple calla lilies

What, you didn’t know calla lilies can also be purple ? They’re just regal flowers, radiating nobility, elegance and majesty. Still, you should know they are just perfect to be grown indoor, even in relatively small pots. They’ll definitely add an extra something to your home.

Purple Lisianthus

They areare usually one to three feet tall, although there are dwarf varieties the only grow up to eight inches in height. Lisianthus, or Eustoma as they are also called, are tricky to grow, and require special attention. They have tiny seeds that must be sown on the surface not buried, and in soils well drained, and safe from fungal invaders.

The Purple Lilac

The Syringa vulgaris, or Lilac, is a genus of about 20-25 species of flowers which typically grow in temperate or Mediterranean areas. What few people know is that this purple shrub is actually related to the olive – but that’s just trivia, pretty irrelevant for its meaning and appearance.

The flower gained attention since ancient times, when the Greeks even used it in their mythology, however, it is believed that the plant was grown since prehistoric times. As the legend goes, the god Pan with the nymph Syringa. Syringa was frightened because Pan had been chasing her through the forests. However, scared by his aspect, she ran away, frightened, and afraid of being caught, she turned herself into a fragrant flowering.

An illustration of Syringa, the nymph

The flower’s color varies from white to purple and in between. The lilac was extremely popular in the Victorian era, in the 1800s, when it was used to show the first emotions of love – it was often use to say “I’m starting to fall in love with you”. In some contexts, it can mean loving protection; the white variety is used to symbolize the uttermost purity, as well as youthful innocence. In Mediterranean cultures, the flower is associated with Easter and the start of the Spring. In the US however, I’ve seen the flower used for quite different symbols: Syringa vulgaris is the state flower of New Hampshire, because it “is symbolic of that hardy character of the men and women of the Granite State”. Strange, but then again, I don’t live in New Hampshire, so what do I know.

In the absence of harsh conditions, Syringa grows anywhere from 2 to 10 meters, usually steming beautiful 20-30 cm purple flowers with a magnificent scent. The flowers are produced in the spring, in a dazzling display of color and smell. Lilac is a shrub, so it’s not really the kind of plant you want to grow indoor. However, if you have a garden, even a small one, you should know that they are low maintenance shrubs, really easy to take care of; they will offer a splendid view, a fantastic scent and once they grow, even some nice summer shade. Syringa doesn’t like too much water, which is why they usually thrive in sandy soils or on hillsides (again, this is just a preference, they do well in any soil type). Like any plants, lilacs will benefit from compost and humus worked into the soil to help retain water during dry spells and to provide additional nutrients. No fertilizer or additional substance is required.

They are susceptible to a few pests and diseases, mostly during hot and humid weather. If anything happens to them just be sure to contact your local florist and he’ll tell you what to do. Other than that, just keep the weeds to a minimum around them (it’s not even necessary to fully remove weeds) and if there’s a drought, give them a little watering – but not too much.

Growing white or purple lilacs is really really easy; just follow these common sense tips and watch them grow and thrive. Some people will tell you these plants are old fashioned or they’re your grandma’s flowers… but that’s just bull – and besides, your grandma knows best.

Purple rose tattoos

Art takes many forms, and especially in modern times, tattoos are already a common trend in many countries. In this post, I’ll share some fantastic purple rose tattoos,  because the symbolism is just extremely powerful, and the overall result is often just stunning.

First off, roses – they are the flower of love, a passionate, intense, burning love. No flower is more direct in meaning than the rose. Then, you have purple – the color of nobility, spirit and mystery. Bind them together, and what do you get? A true, noble love, full of mystery and spiritually charged. If that’s what you’re really feeling and you’re ready to have it on your skin for the rest of your life… then go for it!

More Purple rose tattoo pictures:

Here’s a great design as well

Simple and cute:

A little more intricate and sexy:

Purple Orchid

Purple orchid

Orchids are flowery plants typically native to the tropics, however they’re quite easy to grow in your own garden, as they’re surprisingly durable. With the proper care, nurturing and love, these flowers can grow to live for years and years. These exquisite flowers come in a variety of colors, including purple.

Purple orchid description

Purple orchid

The purple orchid originates from Greece and is a species of orchid in the genus Orchis. “Orchid” comes from the Greek “orchis”, which oddly enough means testicle and represents virility. Maybe in ancient times it was a symbol of manhood, but in our days, women not only adore them, but are also the primary recipients. Double check that with the multibillion dollar flower industry, if you don’t believe me.

The Purple Orchid or the Orchis mascula can grow up to 60 centimeters (24 inches) in height, is green at the base and varying purple on the apex. Its root is made out of two tubers, rounder or ellipsoid. Like most orchids, its leaves are grouped at the base of the stem and are oblong-lanceolate in shape and green in color, although sometimes brownish-purple specks can be observed on the leaves.

The actual inflorescence is between 7 and 12 centimeters long (3 to 4.9 inches) and is comprised of a natural bouquet of 6 to 20 flowers, beautifully lined up in a dense cylinder of spkes. The flower itself is about 2.5 centimeters (0.98 inches) in length and is colored either in pink or violet.

Typically the Purple Orchid blooms April to June.

Purple orchid types

Purple orchid

There are two main purple orchid species. There’s the terrestrial purple orchid that grows on the ground like most commonly sensed plants and flowers. And then there’s the epiphytes purple orchid that grows on trees.

Concerning their color, purple is rather an understatement. Purple orchids come in a myriad of shades and tones, from bright purple to all kinds of lavender shades, depending on the particular species.

Purple orchid species

Purple orchid

  • Orchis mascula subsp. hispanica (A.Niesch. & C.Niesch.) Soó (1972) (Southern Pyrenees, Spain, Portugal, Morocco)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. longibracteatoides Balayer (1986) (Eastern Pyrenees)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. longicalcarata Akhalkatski, H. Baumann, R. Lorenz, Mosulishvili &R. Peter (2005) (Eastern and central Caucasus)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. maghrebiana B. Baumann & H. Baumann (2005)(Morocco)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. mascula (N. & C. Europe to Iran, Canary Islands)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. pinetorum (Boiss. & Kotschy) E.G.Camus (1908) (Macedonia to Iran)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. speciosa (Mutel) Hegi (1909) (Europe)
  • Orchis mascula subsp. wanjkovii (E.Wulff) Soó in G.Keller & al. (1932) (Crimea)

The early purple orchid

Early purple orchid

Orchids are quite widespread, one of the most common types is the early purple orchid, often found in habitats with non-acidic soils such as hedgerows, banks, ancient woodland and open grassland.

Early Purple Orchids display up to 50 dark purple flowers arranged in a dense, cone-shaped cluster on a tall spike. The lower lip of each flower has three lobes and the upper petals form a hood. The leaves of the Early Purple Orchid are glossy and dark green with dark spots, and form a rosette on the ground; they appear from January onwards.

How to care for a purple orchid

Like stated earlier, the orchid typically grows in the tropics, but that doesn’t mean it can’t grow anywhere. If you’re keen on growing your own purple orchids, know that it’s fairly simple, and any amateur gardener can end up with some terrific batches. All you need to do is to treat them with much care, offer them nourishment and of course plenty of love.

  • Be sure to place the purple orchid in indirect sunlight  maybe behind the window curtains since too much ultraviolet rays can burn the plant. Here are some hints to know if you’re purple orchid is getting enough light: look at its leaves. If they’re dark green that the plant isn’t getting enough sun light. If they’re red or yellowish-green than they’re getting too much light. You’ve found the perfect balance if your leaves are a bright green.
  • Like for all plant cultures, ambient temperature is very important. While orchids can deal with temperatures as low as 55 degrees Fahrenheit and as high as 90 degrees, it won’t hold out for long in these conditions. Ideally, the room in which you grow your purple orchids should be between 60 and 62 degrees at night and between 70 and 80 during the day. Avoid constant temperature through out the day since the orchid needs to enter its natural cycle, which entails a slight temperature fluctuation during the day.
  • Air circulation is also particularly important. Be sure to have fresh air in contact with your orchid. You can easily achieve this by placing it near and open window during summer time or by simply employing an oscillating fan during winter. The fresh air replenishes the plant with much needed carbon dioxide.
  • On to watering, which maybe interests you most of all. During the winter, water the purple orchid only once weekly, and twice weekly during the summer (higher temperatures). If possible avoid tap water, since it has chlorine and might harm the plant.
  • If you want to pump up the process a bit, you can use a fertilizer that has a balanced mix of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium.

Purple orchid bouquets and arrangements

Purple orchid wedding arrangement

The purple orchid is both exquisite and fairly inexpensive, making it an ideal component for lush arrangements or bouquets. Purple orchid arrangements have become quite popular with weddings, since people seem to appreciate their sweet and exotic color. If you really want to hold a wedding in style, go for lavender orchids for corsages or boutonniere. You’ll definitely attract some eyes with this elegant piece.

Still sticking to arrangements, remember to use a proper coloring scheme when arranging your purple orchids. Use light colors in deep purple orchid arrangements and cream, beige and perhaps pink and lime yellow in lavender orchids arrangements.

If you want to arrange the perfect purple orchid bridal bouquets go for the lavender orchids. There’s no better way to spell the firm elegance of femininity than this extraordinary amalgam of orange tulips, with yellow, deep pink spray roses and green dendrobium orchids.